Set the Timecode Mode - :pulse

Set the Timecode Mode

For time synchronisation, your :pulse can be used independently (free running) or as part of a BLINK network, where it can be set as a master or slave. If it is set to be a master, it will send its timecode to the slave devices in the BLINK network, and if it is a slave, it will receive timecode from a master device.

You can set your :pulse to free run or operate as a master or slave, by using the Timecode Mode setting.

Timecode Mode Operation
Free Run/Jam-Ext

:pulse runs independently (free running). It is not part of a BLINK network.

In Free Run/Jam Ext mode, you need to synchronise ('jam' ) the :pulse with timecode from an external source. It can then be used independently and it can output the timecode via its TC or TC/SYNC port. For more details, see Free Running and Jamming.

Int-Gen TX

:pulse is the master unit and it uses the timecode values that you apply in the :pulse's settings. The timecode will be sent to any slave devices in the same BLINK network, and can also be sent to a device that is connected to the :pulse via the TC port.

You can set the timecode for the :pulse manually, by using its Set T/C setting (see Set the Timecode Data.

Ext-TC TX :pulse is the master unit and gets its timecode values from an external source, such as a camera (via a LEMO® 5 connector). :pulse then sends its timecode to the slaves in the same BLINK network. If the external timecode source is disconnected, the clock in the :pulse and the slaves 'freeze' at that time.
Ext-TC/C TX

:pulse is the master unit and gets its timecode settings from an external source, such as a camera (via a LEMO® 5 connector). :pulse then sends the timecode to the slaves in the same BLINK network. If the external timecode source is disconnected, the :pulse will use its internal timecode instead. It will send this timecode to the slave devices.

Ext-RF Slave

:pulse acts as a slave unit and receives its timecode from a master device in the BLINK network. It communicates regularly with the master to make sure that its timecode matches the timecode of the master, and it also sends its status data to the master device. If the :pulse is connected to a camera or sound mixer, it can output its timecode via its TC port or TC/SYNC port.

For more details, see Set up Timecode Output.

Note: If you are unfamiliar with the concept of master and slave devices, please read Master and Slave Relationships in a BLINK Network.

To set the Timecode Mode:

  1. Switch on your :pulse unit (see Switch :pulse On and Off).

  2. Press the control knob.

  3. Turn the control knob to scroll to the Timecode Mode option.
  4. Press the control knob.

  5. Turn the control knob to scroll to the required Timecode Mode.

  6. Press the control knob to confirm your selection.

To illustrate how the timecode modes work, we have included examples of each setup.

Example: Free Run/Jam Ext Mode

A sound engineer is working on a scene that is dangerous and so she needs to be able to put the sound mixer in place and then control it remotely, from a safe position. There is no need to synchronise the audio with any other sound or video recordings that are taking place.

To achieve this, the sound engineer connects the sound mixer to the :pulse like this:

Sound Mixer Cable :pulse
BNC input BNC to BNC TC/SYNC (BNC Output)
TC input/output 5-pin to 5-pin LEMO TC
USB B 9-pin data to USB B cable DATA

She then sets the :pulse to run in Free Jam/Ext-T mode and enables the Wi-Fi feature, so that the BLINK Hub app can connect to the :pulse wirelessly. To conserve battery power, she turns the Ethernet support off.

Next, she jams the :pulse to the sound mixer's timecode by using the TC Generator > Jam EXT T/C setting. The :pulse then jams (synchronises) with the sound mixer.

When the jamming is complete, the engineer positions the sound mixer and :pulse in a suitable position for making the recording and then moves away to a safe position. The :pulse needs to be connected to the sound mixer via the DATA port to allow the sound mixer to be controlled remotely.

From her new location, which is in range of the :pulse, the engineer launches the BLINK Hub app on her tablet. It connects to the :pulse via Wi-Fi, and she can then control the sound mixer from BLINK Hub.

Pulse Free Running with BLINK Hub Remote Control of Sound Mixer

 

The following day, the engineer repeats this process, making sure to resynchronise the :pulse with the sound mixer (this keeps the timecode synchronised with the sound mixer's internal clock, which is less accurate than the :pulse's clock and so is more prone to clock drift).

Example: Int-Gen TX Mode

An outdoor scene is being filmed, using two cameras, with a sound mixer recording the audio. To synchronise all of the video and audio recordings, :pulse units are connected to the cameras and the sound mixer.

To achieve this, the sound mixer is connected to a :pulse via the TC/SYNC port (for word clock) and TC port for timecode. This :pulse is set to run in Int-Gen TX mode so that it is the master.

The cameras are connected to :pulses via the TC/SYNC ports for genlock and TC port for timecode. They are set to run in RF Slave mode.

The sound engineer enters the required timecode for the shoot into the master :pulse's settings. The master :pulse then sends its timecode to the slave :pulses via RF. It also outputs the timecode to the sound mixer.

The slave :pulses receive the timecode and apply it locally. They then send the timecode to the cameras via the TC port. They also send genlock signals to the cameras, via the TC/SYNC port.

Master :pulse sending timecode to slave :pulses

Example: Ext-TC TX Mode

Let's say you are using multiple cameras and a sound mixer, all connected to :pulse units. The sound mixer's :pulse is set to run in Ext-TC TX mode (master) and the camera :pulse units are set to run as RF slaves.

The sound mixer is connected to its :pulse via the TC port for timecode and the TC/SYNC port for word clock. The :pulse receives timecode from the sound mixer and passes it on to the slave :pulses, so that they can feed it into the cameras. The cameras and sound mixer are all synchronised.

Master :pulse sending timecode to slave :pulses

During filming, the sound mixer becomes disconnected and so it cannot provide its :pulse with timecode. At this point, the :pulse 'freezes' its internal clock and stops sending timecode data to the slaves.

:pulse clocks are frozen when the external timecode source is disconnected

Example: Ext-TC/C TX Mode

Let's say you are using multiple cameras and a sound mixer, all connected to :pulse units. The sound mixer's :pulse is set to run in Ext-TC/C TX mode (master), and the camera :pulse units are set to run as RF slaves.

The sound mixer is connected to its :pulse via the TC port for timecode and the TC/SYNC port for word clock. The :pulse receives timecode from the sound mixer and passes it on to the slave :pulses, so that they can feed it into the cameras. The cameras and sound mixer are all synchronised.

Master :pulse sending timecode to slave :pulses

During filming, the sound mixer is disconnected, and it cannot provide its :pulse with timecode. At this point, the master :pulse switches to its internal timecode instead of the external timecode source, and passes this timecode on to the slaves. The internal clock is already closely matched to the external timecode source, so there is no sudden jump in the recording.

Sound mixer is disconnected so :pulse provides timecode source

Example: Ext RF Slave Mode

Imagine you are going to film a ski event and you are using two video cameras for wide shots and GoPro HERO4™ Black cameras for the skiers' perspectives. To synchronise the recording, you connect a :pulse to each video camera, and a SyncBac PRO to each HERO4™ Black. The SyncBac PROs and HERO4™s are worn by the skiers.

One :pulse as master, :pulse and SYNCbac PROs as RF Slaves

The :pulses and SyncBac PROs are set to use the same RF channel so that they form a BLINK network. There can only be one master device in a BLINK network, so one of the :pulses is set to run in Int-Gen TX mode and the other :pulse and the SyncBac PROs are set to run as RF Slaves.

The RF Slave :pulse and SyncBac PROs are synchronised with the master :pulse and then moved into position for filming. They will receive their timecode from the master :pulse while it is in range and will switch to their own internal clocks when out of range of the master.

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